Supervisor Spotlight: Latrice Love

“I love being the person that others can depend on when the world around them may have turned their back.”

Dr. Latrice Love, PhD, LPC is a professional counselor licensed in four states: Colorado, Georgia, North Carolina, and South Carolina. A self-described life-long learner (with the degrees to show for it), Latrice is generative in her approach to supervision, passing down the experience and wisdom cultivated from her own professional growth. 

For Latrice, the call to do good work in the world came early. Growing up in South Central Los Angeles, Latrice remembers always wanting to help people in need while simultaneously recognizing the struggles and limited opportunities available to people in her community. 

After earning her G.E.D., however, education became vital to her. She went on to earn a BA in Psychology from Chaminade University; a Master’s Degree in Human Resource Management from Central Michigan University; a Master’s in Counseling from Webster University; a Doctoral degree in Business Administration from the University of Phoenix; and is currently pursuing a Doctoral degree in Clinical Psychology from Capella University. Did we mention she was also enrolled in the military? 

With an initial thought to go into finance, Latrice quickly realized that she dreaded anything that felt like a “sell.” What she did love, however, was the energy that came from helping individuals and families plan for their future. She made moves to do that full-time and hasn’t looked back. 

“My diverse background enables me to truly relate to people from various walks of life,” Latrice says of her experiences. “I can meet them where they are to engage in change, trust, and healing.”

Healing Through L.O.V.E. 

Now in private practice, Latrice works with several populations. “My niche is working with the LGBTQ+ community on an array of concerns, including, but not limited to, depression, gender dysphoria, anxiety, gender reassignment, and sexual matters. I love working with this population, because I know first hand what it is like to be shunned, and I love being the person that others can depend on when the world around them may have turned their back.”

Throughout her work, Latrice developed a personal model called the L.O.V.E. model (L.O.V.E. stands for learning, observing, visualizing and evolving). 

“It serves as a template that I use to help the LGBTQ+ population, in particular, navigate their journey,” she explains. “I also have a unique comfort when it comes to discussing taboo topics or things that simply make some people feel uncomfortable.” 

You Cannot Help Everyone

As a supervisor, Latrice’s top three values are honesty, respect, and humility. She offers this to her supervisees and expects it in return. 

“I firmly believe that real change, acceptance, and growth begins when the decision is made to be open and honest,” she says. “I have a straightforward approach, but it comes from a place of concern and respect. I provide a safe space for the people around me to ‘spit it out,’ so we can focus on the solution.”

She’s aware that because of her diverse background and accomplishments, there is often an expectation for her to “know it all.” But regardless of all she does know, it’s her growth mindset that keeps her curious and open to new ways of doing things. 

“I’m continually seeking out ways to do things better or more efficiently,” she says. “I demonstrate this for my supervisees and welcome them into a space where they can feel comfortable not getting things right the first time while having the ability to stay motivated and try again.”

The best pieces of advice she remembers receiving when she was in supervision were “you cannot help everyone” and “stay in your lane.” While she felt some resistance to this advice, initially, she has come to respect the words for the boundaries and expectations they communicate.

“I learned along the way that the word ‘no’ is a complete sentence,” she says. “Besides, I realized that if I get burned out while trying to save the world, the work that I am doing will cease to exist.”

The Learner is a Teacher

Not only a learner, Latrice is also a professor and sees her natural approach to supervision through educating first. To help supervisees become more aware of themselves and counter-transference concerns, she first ensures they understand the concepts. She then has them work through scenarios to identify examples of the concepts taught. 

“I also believe in getting to know the people I work with, including my supervisees,” she says. “This rapport provides a comfort level to disclose specific examples of their work in the field to help them learn. When processing these experiences, I ask direct questions that provide an opportunity for them to recognize things that may need to be addressed or modified. This approach allows them to gain the skill and remain aware when they are no longer in supervision.”

Latrice also encourages continuing education after graduate school and highly recommends her supervisees learn state laws, regulations, and important dates. 

“As an ‘out of the box’ thinker with creative approaches,” she says, “it is essential to stay within the parameters that are in place for the client’s safety as well as the profession.”

For additional resources, she recommends Mindful Everyday and Therapist Toolbox on Facebook, NBCC.org, counseling.org, therapistaid.com (for free worksheets and resources), pesi.com (several free or low-cost training courses), and the board/specialty websites that govern any specific career interests such as SAMHSA.gov for individuals interested in substance abuse.

One of Latrice’s most important professional influences is close to her heart: her younger sister Erin, who is also a Licensed Professional Counselor and doing great things in the community.

“Her growth as a person and as a professional resonates with me as an immediate reminder of integrity, and the importance of humility,” Latrice says. “Being honest with her when I’ve made mistakes and looping her in when goals are met has provided direct insight for her to make informed decisions. Having someone look up to you is more pressure than making a mentor proud!”

Latrice finds that her sister influences her as well, reminding her that she is enough and doesn’t have to pretend to be anything other than who she is. 

Supervision On-The-Go

Even learning about Motivo came through a continuing education course offered through AMHCA (American Mental Health Counselors Association). Latrice had been providing therapy online and was interested in how she could also provide supervision. She is interested in the future of clinical supervision moving online as it allows counselors to connect with more people, more often.

“As we gain access to more resources, we take on more tasks and struggle to find time for the things that matter to us the most,” she says. “The mental health professionals I know don’t do the best job with self-care. Having the ability to get supervision and consultation on-the-go is a fantastic opportunity. There is still an uphill battle in specific states for the support needed to offer supervision online, but the future is here, and going backward is no longer an option.” 

To learn more about Latrice, you can find her on Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter and at www.latricelove.com.

Think Latrice might be the perfect supervisor for you?

We’d love to introduce you to Latrice through a free, 30-minute video call. Click here to let us know if you’re interested in connecting with her or one of our Motivo team members.

Emily Donahue

Emily Donahue

Emily Donahue holds a Master's in Mental Health Counseling from Northwestern University. She works as a limited permit therapist at a private practice in Brooklyn, earning her clinical and supervision hours for full licensure. She has a special interest in women and alcohol use and her dream is to meet Irvin Yalom one day.

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